St Teilo’s pupils choose to use their Fairtrade power

Pupils and teachers at St Teilo’s Catholic School, Tenby, have been learning about how they can make choices to improve the lives of farmers and workers who make many products we consume and use.

Tuesday 1st March 2022 8:50 am
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St. Teilo’s pupils, Tenby, with Fair Trade In Football Campaign founder Sharron Hardwick
St. Teilo’s pupils, Tenby, with Fair Trade In Football Campaign founder Sharron Hardwick (Supplied pic. )

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During a Fairtrade Fortnight, Fair Trade In Football Campaign Founder, Sharron Hardwick, visited St Teilo’s Classes 3 and 4 last Monday, leading two workshops teaching about the difference choosing Fairtrade certified items makes to workers, their families and communities.

Pupils learned about a family of banana farmers who often struggle to make ends meet despite working hard, and about football production and injustices which have occurred in the industry and how, despite positive changes to cut child labour, workers still struggle to meet their basic needs.

Sharron shared how we have power in our hands to improve lives via our choices. Choosing Fairtrade certified items guarantees that workers receive a fairer deal, with safe and fair working conditions, no forced or child labour, with workers’ rights and at least a guaranteed Fairtrade minimum price for farmers if goods drop in value.

Fairtrade Standards also encourage producers to protect the environment by improving soil, planting trees, conserving water and avoiding pesticides, while Fairtrade’s programmes include climate academies for farmers to share best practice. At the same time, Fairtrade makes training available to producers so that they can use the latest agricultural methods, such as intercropping and shade-grown coffee to adapt to conditions.

One aspect of Fairtrade that really impressed the pupils was the Fairtrade Premium; an extra sum of money paid on each Fairtrade item sold. Fairtrade Premiums are distributed by individual Fairtrade committees who buy whatever they deem is needed in their communities. Clean water, improved sanitation, education, equipment, training, health care, work transport are some examples of how the Fairtrade Premium money is used to improve lives and communities.

Pupils at St. Teilos School, Tenby with Fair Trade Football Campaign Founder Sharron Hardwick
(Supplied pic. ) (Supplied pic.)

“After two years of zoom lessons, it was fantastic to be back in the classroom. St Teilo’s pupils behaved excellently, they had lots of questions and impressive answers, showing real interest and compassion. I hope they will use the power in their hands to make good choices and to share how Fairtrade can improve lives.” said Sharron Hardwick.

Pupils are now working making Fairtrade posters and writing letters, which Sharron hopes to take to The Jubilee Room at Westminster where she is speaking as part of a Fairtrade Panel in May.


For information on Fairtrade visit: www.fairtrade.org.uk https://fairtrade.wales/

For information on the Fair Trade In Football Campaign visit www.fairtradeinfootball.com

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